Priest Exposes Parallels in Jewish, Yazidi Genocides

On Aug. 3, 2014, Islamic State blitzed through dozens of northern Iraq’s minority-inhabited towns and villages, expelling, kidnapping, enslaving and massacring along the way. Many Christian, Shabak and Kakai’i people lost everything and were forced to flee their ancestral lands. But none suffered like the Yazidis.

Read more here in the Atlanta Jewish Times

An American Jew in Kurdistan

There are roughly 200,000 Jews of Kurdish origin living in Israel, descendants of the Jewish community of Kurdistan, which mostly made aliyah in 1950-1952, along with the rest of Iraqi Jewry, as part of the Israeli airlift code-named “Operation Ezra and Nehemiah.” There is a smattering of mostly secretive Crypto-Jews remaining in Iraqi Kurdistan (formally known as the Kurdistan Region of Iraq) called BenJews those whose ancestors converted to Islam but who are still vaguely aware of their Jewish origins.

Read more here in Jewish Currents

Kurds Must Be Part of the New Middle East: Interview with Dr. Mehmet Gurses & Dr. David Romano

Now [Kurds] have two main choices (mostly in Iraq): 1. they can chose to become independent or they can somehow persuade these countries to provide them with full equality and democracy. There is a cost to war sometimes and it may pit democracy against independence. This may not result in the same outcome in all four countries but as it is often said, ‘democracy is a journey, not a destination.’

Read more here in Kurdistan Tribune

INTERVIEW: ANO ABDOKA POLITICAL LEADER IN ANKAWA

First of all, Iraq and Kurdistan Region are two different situations: politically, socially, and culturally. Iraq is disastrous and not only for Christians. Before the war in 2003 there were roughly 1.5 million Christians and now there are only around 100,000 in the entire country.

Read more here in Philos Project

And here in Ankawa.com

Instability In Iraq: A Historical Tragedy

While Western governments, the media, and concerned citizens continue to wring their hands in frustration about the best approach in dealing with the current IS terror reign one consistent aspect rings true about the current Republic of Iraq: it was not truly stable before 2003, and it is was not truly stable in 1932.

Read more on KurdishPolicy.com