Very Quietly, Israel and Iraqi Kurdistan Build Ties

Since the U.S. invasion of Iraq in 2003 and the removal of Saddam Hussein, Israel and Iraq’s autonomous Kurdish region have steadily converged toward one another, despite their official stance that there are no such relations. In reality, their forbidden friendship is purposefully opaque due to lack of formal ties between Tel Aviv and Baghdad—and has frequently circumvented such diplomatic protocols.

Read more here in WarisBoring,com

INTERVIEW: ANO ABDOKA POLITICAL LEADER IN ANKAWA

First of all, Iraq and Kurdistan Region are two different situations: politically, socially, and culturally. Iraq is disastrous and not only for Christians. Before the war in 2003 there were roughly 1.5 million Christians and now there are only around 100,000 in the entire country.

Read more here in Philos Project

And here in Ankawa.com

Jewish Shrine Defies ISIS ON War’s Edge

Kweskin confirmed facts about the tomb of Nahum reported by journalists from National Geographic and Haaretz newspaper during the last two years. Jews in the area were forced to flee AlQosh in 1948, at which time the iron keys to the tomb were handed to an Assyrian-Christian man named Sami Jajouhana who agreed to look after it…”

Read more here at Philos Project 

Yezidi vulnerability before ISIS

ISIS’ infamous brutality is a culmination of an otherwise long and violent record of militant attacks against this persecuted minority over the last several years. Out of the dozens of attacks, it is noteworthy that as far back (at least) as 2004, Yezidis have been targeted by extremists.

Read more here at Kurdistan24.net.

The Syrian crisis, with some perspective

The United States has largely chosen to close its eyes and borders to the unprecedented refugee crisis and simultaneously fall into the trap laid by the international terrorists these desperate people are fleeing from. France, on the other hand, which experienced its worst attacks on its soil since the end of World War II, has remained steadfast and declared it would welcome 30,000 over a three year period.

Read more here at Kurdistan24.net.

Praying at a Jewish Tomb in the Shadow of ISIS

Back when they still lived in Iraq, Kurdish Jews had a famous saying about the ancient synagogue believed to house the tomb of a biblical prophet in this beleaguered town on the high northern plateau of Nineveh province.

On Shavuot they said, “He who has not made the pilgrimage to Nahum’s tomb has not yet known real pleasure.”

Read more here in the Forward

and here (Hungarian)

Jumping on the Kurdish Bandwagon

Many policymakers, politicians and writers have the gall to continue demanding that Kurds remain part of a “unified” Iraq — despite the fact that Kurds are almost unanimously opposed to IS; that the Kurdish people have been oppressed and persecuted and had genocide committed against them by various iterations of Baghdad since Iraq’s inception; and that almost every Kurd wants to live in a free and independent state.

Read more on Rudaw.net