Very Quietly, Israel and Iraqi Kurdistan Build Ties

Since the U.S. invasion of Iraq in 2003 and the removal of Saddam Hussein, Israel and Iraq’s autonomous Kurdish region have steadily converged toward one another, despite their official stance that there are no such relations. In reality, their forbidden friendship is purposefully opaque due to lack of formal ties between Tel Aviv and Baghdad—and has frequently circumvented such diplomatic protocols.

Read more here in WarisBoring,com

Priest Exposes Parallels in Jewish, Yazidi Genocides

On Aug. 3, 2014, Islamic State blitzed through dozens of northern Iraq’s minority-inhabited towns and villages, expelling, kidnapping, enslaving and massacring along the way. Many Christian, Shabak and Kakai’i people lost everything and were forced to flee their ancestral lands. But none suffered like the Yazidis.

Read more here in the Atlanta Jewish Times

Israel’s ambivalent relations with Turkey’s Kurds

Unlike the warm, if not ambiguous and largely indirect relationship between Israel and Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) in Iraq, relations between Israeli and Kurdish actors in Turkey have been considerably more fraught. For Turkey’s Kurds, pro-Israel sentiment has been less forthcoming and enthusiastic —Israel is often viewed as participating in regional realpolitik with NATO-ally Turkey—often at the expense of Kurds.

Read more here at Vocal Europe

An American Jew in Kurdistan

There are roughly 200,000 Jews of Kurdish origin living in Israel, descendants of the Jewish community of Kurdistan, which mostly made aliyah in 1950-1952, along with the rest of Iraqi Jewry, as part of the Israeli airlift code-named “Operation Ezra and Nehemiah.” There is a smattering of mostly secretive Crypto-Jews remaining in Iraqi Kurdistan (formally known as the Kurdistan Region of Iraq) called BenJews those whose ancestors converted to Islam but who are still vaguely aware of their Jewish origins.

Read more here in Jewish Currents

INTERVIEW: ANO ABDOKA POLITICAL LEADER IN ANKAWA

First of all, Iraq and Kurdistan Region are two different situations: politically, socially, and culturally. Iraq is disastrous and not only for Christians. Before the war in 2003 there were roughly 1.5 million Christians and now there are only around 100,000 in the entire country.

Read more here in Philos Project

And here in Ankawa.com

Revisiting the Relationship Between Armenians and Kurds

Coming out of the genocide, there was a common cause shortly afterward. Armenians were helpful and sympathetic to the Kurds in the 1920s and 1930s. It is also noteworthy that today there is a solid relationship among these diaspora communities.

For more read here at Philos Project

U.S. presidential candidates: ambiguous Kurdish support

Though Iraqi Kurds are more than deserving of U.S.-backing, comprehensive policies should not be partisan-based—U.S. foreign policy should remain debated among Democrats and Republicans alike.

Read more here at Kurdistan24.net.

Yezidi vulnerability before ISIS

ISIS’ infamous brutality is a culmination of an otherwise long and violent record of militant attacks against this persecuted minority over the last several years. Out of the dozens of attacks, it is noteworthy that as far back (at least) as 2004, Yezidis have been targeted by extremists.

Read more here at Kurdistan24.net.