Syrian Kurdish Refugees Start Over In Atlanta

We are originally from Afrin but lived in Aleppo (Syria’s second city) and moved there when we were children. We grew up with nothing. Though we went to school, no one cared about us; we we did not even have bicycles like my children now have. The Syrian government [led by former dictator Hafez al-Assad did not care about us. They did not like us or care about us because we are Kurds. The government did not invest in Kurdish areas as a policy: there was no industry, no new schools—nothing. We are very proud to be Kurdish: we named our children after a famous Kurdish folk song.

Read more here in KurdistanTribune

Kurds Must Be Part of the New Middle East: Interview with Dr. Mehmet Gurses & Dr. David Romano

Now [Kurds] have two main choices (mostly in Iraq): 1. they can chose to become independent or they can somehow persuade these countries to provide them with full equality and democracy. There is a cost to war sometimes and it may pit democracy against independence. This may not result in the same outcome in all four countries but as it is often said, ‘democracy is a journey, not a destination.’

Read more here in Kurdistan Tribune

The Syrian crisis, with some perspective

The United States has largely chosen to close its eyes and borders to the unprecedented refugee crisis and simultaneously fall into the trap laid by the international terrorists these desperate people are fleeing from. France, on the other hand, which experienced its worst attacks on its soil since the end of World War II, has remained steadfast and declared it would welcome 30,000 over a three year period.

Read more here at Kurdistan24.net.